THREE-YEAR-OLD CURRICULUM INFORMATION

  • SPECIFIC GOALS FOR YOUR TWO-YEAR-OLD and THREE-YEAR-OLD

Name three objects in a picture.

Develop understanding and use of vocabulary related to classroom routines:  snack time,
restroom, etc.

Develop vocabulary for social communication and interaction through cooperative games,
discussing experiences, and singing games.

VISUAL SKILLS

Match, sort and name basic colors and shapes.

Sequence objects by size.

Identify positions of objects.

Classify objects by general categories.

Duplicate three dimensional designs with objects (beads, pegboards, cubes.

Reproduce a sequence of at least three items from memory.

Recognize similarities and differences in a variety of objects.

AUDITORY AWARENESS SKILLS

Attend and respond to the presence and/or absence of sound (music and environmental
sounds).

Locate the direction of sound.

Recognize gross differences in sound characteristics (loud and soft, fast and slow).

Listen to and state the basic content of a simple story.

Follow a series of two directions with appropriate motor actions.

Identify a specified word in a sentence context.

GROSS AND FINE MOTOR SKILLS

Imitate simple body movements and positions.

Walk forward, backward and change direction on the floor and on, walking boards.

Move spontaneously to music.

Follow a simple walking pattern.

Roll, catch and bounce a ball.

Perform a given action quickly or slowly.

Perform a given action from verbal instructions (one or two actions in each sequence).

Move through a simple obstacle course.

Use clothing appropriately (button, snaps and zippers).

Spoon and pour (water, sand, dried:  peas, beans, rice).

Cut simple patterns (fringe, straight line) with scissors.

Work with equipment (line up chairs, stack objects).

Work with clay.

INTERACTING WITH PEERS AND ADULTS

Cooperate with others in the classroom by following rules, by helping to establish rules, and by
learning to modify rules when necessary.

Share and take turns.

Give help to other children when requested to do so by a child or by the teacher.

Engage in discussions and activities that involve adults and other children in the classroom.

Play and work cooperatively.

Help with simple tasks such as clean-up, serving snacks and so forth.

Respond to basic manners, such as health and table manners.

PERSONAL INDEPENDENCE AND POSITIVE SELF CONCEPT

Care for his/her own physical needs such as dressing, toileting and eating.

Attend to tasks for increasingly longer periods of time.

Assume independent responsibility for completing tasks.

Indicate willingness to attempt successively more difficult tasks.

Respond to social reinforcement:  smiles, supportive words, embraces rather than concrete
rewards.

Respond to health and grooming suggestions.

Set realistic goals for him/herself.

Work independently.